STILL – YET – ALREADY | What Are the Differences?

Still – yet – already are words which often cause trouble for students of English. So let’s try and distinguish clearly between them.

STILL – YET – ALREADY

STILL

a. Situations that continue to the present time. It is used in the past present or future. Still is placed in front of the main verb:

Examples:

  • It is still raining.
  • I still live in London.
  • They’ve been married for 30 years and are still in love.
  • I still meet my friends from my schooldays now and then.
  • Is your sister still at university?
  • They are still living in the old farmhouse.
  • We will still be at work when you arrive.

b. Action that is not expected because of something else

Examples:

  • He was sick but he still went to work.
  • I studied a lot though I still didn’t pass the exam.

Still is placed after the verb to be and before an adjective:

  • Her parents are still alive.
  • We were unlucky with the weather in Greece but we were still happy with the holiday.

YET

“Yet” is used in a negative sentence or in a question. “Yet” is placed at the end of a sentence or question.

a. To ask if something expected has happened.

Examples:

  • Have the test results arrived yet?
  • I’m hungry. Is dinner already yet?
  • Has she emailed you yet?

b. To say something expected hasn’t happened.

Examples:

  • haven’t done my homework yet.
  • It’s almost 11 o’clock and John hasn’t woken up yet.
  • Kevin hasn’t registered for class yet.
  • haven’t finished my breakfast yet.

ALREADY

a. An action has happened sooner than expected.

  • I have just finished lunch but I’m already hungry.
  • I think Mary already knows about the surprise party.
  • The plane had already landed when the pilot announced that there would be a delay in getting to the gate.
  • There are already about ten people here
  • We already knew that he was coming to visit.
  • His family had already heard the news.
  • Joe’s already here, so we can begin.

b. “Already” is placed after the verb to be and before the adjective like “still”:

  • Fifteen minutes after the play had started we were already bored.
  • They knew that they were already late for the meeting.

STILL – YET – ALREADY | Image

STILL - YET - ALREADY

STILL - YET - ALREADY | What Are the Differences? 1

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I need Difference anything Words and English