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Me Either or Me Neither: How to Express Agreement

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Me either or me neither in your conversations? These two phrases are often used interchangeably, but they do have some subtle differences.

Both “me either” and “me neither” are used to agree with a negative statement. However, there are some situations where one phrase is more appropriate than the other. In the following sections, we’ll delve into the differences between these two expressions and provide some helpful guidelines for when to use each one.

Me Either or Me Neither: Let’s Settle this Once and for All!

Me Either or Me Neither: How to Express Agreement

Me Either or Me Neither

Origin of Phrases

The phrases ‘me either’ and ‘me neither’ are both commonly used to indicate agreement with a negative statement. However, their origins are slightly different.

‘Me either’ is thought to have originated in the United States, where it has become more prevalent in everyday language. On the other hand, ‘me neither’ is more commonly used in the United Kingdom and Canada.

Common Usage

Despite their different origins, ‘me either’ and ‘me neither’ are largely interchangeable in modern usage. However, there are some subtle differences in how they are used.

‘Me either’ is often used to indicate agreement with a negative statement, whereas ‘me neither’ is used to indicate that the speaker also does not do or have something. For example:

  • “I don’t like coffee.” “Me either.”
  • “I haven’t been to Paris.” “Me neither.”

In both cases, the speaker is indicating agreement with a negative statement. However, ‘me either’ is used to indicate general agreement, while ‘me neither’ is used to indicate specific agreement with the speaker’s own experience.

It’s worth noting that some people consider ‘me either’ to be ungrammatical, and prefer to use ‘neither do I’ instead. However, this is largely a matter of personal preference and both phrases are widely used.

Grammatical Rules

When using ‘me either’ or ‘me neither’ in a sentence, it is essential to ensure that the subject and verb agree with each other. If the subject is singular, then the verb should be singular as well, and if the subject is plural, then the verb should be plural.

For example:

  • Incorrect: Me either is going to the party.
  • Correct: I am not going to the party, and she’s not going either.

In the above example, the subject ‘me either’ is used incorrectly.

Practical Usage

Here’s a table that summarizes the differences between ‘me either’ and ‘me neither’:

Me Either Me Neither
Less grammatically correct More grammatically correct
Used in the United States More common in the UK
Used to agree with negative and positive statements Used to agree with negative statements only

In Casual Conversations

In casual conversations, both ‘me either’ and ‘me neither’ are widely used to express agreement with negative statements. However, ‘me either’ is considered more common in American English, while ‘me neither’ is more common in British English and Canadian English.

Although ‘me either’ is considered more common in American English, both phrases are widely understood and accepted in casual conversations.

In Formal Writing

In formal writing, it’s generally recommended to use more grammatically correct alternatives to ‘me either’ and ‘me neither’. However, if you do choose to use these phrases, it’s important to use them correctly.

Here are some examples of how to use ‘me either’ and ‘me neither’ in formal writing:

  • Incorrect: Mr. Willams has not had much experience in this domain yet, and me neither.
  • Correct: Mr. Willams has not had much experience in this domain yet, and neither have I.

Common Errors

When it comes to using “me either” or “me neither,” there are a few common misconceptions and errors that people make. Let’s take a closer look at some of these.

Error #1: Using “me either” to agree with a positive statement

One common error is using “me either” to agree with a positive statement. This is incorrect, as “me either” is only used to agree with a negative statement. If you want to agree with a positive statement, you should use “me too.”

For example:

  • “I love pizza.” – “Me too.”
  • “I don’t like mushrooms on my pizza.” – “Me neither.”

Error #2: Using “me neither” to agree with a negative statement that includes “either”

Another error is using “me neither” to agree with a negative statement that includes the word “either.” This is incorrect, as “me neither” is only used to agree with a negative statement that includes the word “not.” If the negative statement includes the word “either,” you should use “me either.”

For example:

  • “I don’t like either coffee or tea.” – “Me either.”
  • “I don’t like coffee or tea.” – “Me neither.”

Conclusion

In conclusion, the differences between “me either” and “me neither” are relatively minor. While “me either” is more common in the US, “me neither” is more common in the UK and Canada. Both phrases are idiomatic and do not have precise meanings.

When using these phrases, it’s important to consider the context and the intended meaning. If you want to express agreement with a negative statement, use “me neither.” If you want to express agreement with a positive statement, use “me either.”

Here are some example sentences to illustrate the differences:

  • “I don’t like sushi.” – “Me neither.”
  • “I love sushi.” – “Me either.”
  • “I haven’t seen that movie yet.” – “Me neither.”
  • “I’ve seen that movie three times.” – “Me either.”

Additionally, it’s important to note that these phrases are informal and may not be appropriate in all situations. In formal writing or speech, it’s best to use more precise language to avoid confusion or ambiguity.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I properly use ‘either’ and ‘neither’ in English grammar?

‘Either’ and ‘neither’ are used to refer to two things or people. ‘Either’ is used to indicate that one of two options is true or correct, while ‘neither’ is used to indicate that neither of the two options is true or correct.

What is the difference between ‘me either’ and ‘me neither’?

‘Me either’ and ‘me neither’ are both used to indicate agreement with a negative statement. However, ‘me either’ is often considered ungrammatical and should be avoided in formal writing. ‘Me neither’ is the correct phrase to use in this context.

What are some examples of using ‘me either’ or ‘me neither’?

  • A: I don’t like sushi.
  • B: Me neither.
  • A: I haven’t been to the gym in weeks.
  • B: Me either.

What is the rule for using ‘either’ and ‘neither’ in English grammar?

When using ‘either’ and ‘neither’, it is important to remember that ‘either’ is used to indicate one of two options, while ‘neither’ is used to indicate that neither of the two options is true or correct. When agreeing with a negative statement, ‘me neither’ is the correct phrase to use.

'Either' and 'neither' are used to refer to two things or people. 'Either' is used to indicate that one of two options is true or correct, while 'neither' is used to indicate that neither of the two options is true or correct.

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'Me either' and 'me neither' are both used to indicate agreement with a negative statement. However, 'me either' is often considered ungrammatical and should be avoided in formal writing. 'Me neither' is the correct phrase to use in this context.

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  • A: I don't like sushi.
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  • B: Me neither.
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  • A: I haven't been to the gym in weeks.
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  • B: Me either.
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'Me neither' means that the speaker agrees with a negative statement made by someone else. It is often used in informal conversation.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What is the meaning of 'me either'?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

'Me either' is an incorrect phrase that is often used instead of 'me neither'. It means the same thing as 'me neither', but should be avoided in formal writing.

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When using 'either' and 'neither', it is important to remember that 'either' is used to indicate one of two options, while 'neither' is used to indicate that neither of the two options is true or correct. When agreeing with a negative statement, 'me neither' is the correct phrase to use.

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