How To Avoid Using The Word VERY in English

Avoid using the word VERY because it’s lazy.

There are a few quotes that verify this idea and are stated below:

“Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. ~Mark Twain”

“‘Very’ is the most useless word in the English language and can always come out. More than useless, it is treacherous because it invariably weakens what it is intended to strengthen. ~Florence King”

“So avoid using the word ‘very’ because it’s lazy. A man is not very tired, he is exhausted. Don’t use very sad, use morose. Language was invented for one reason, boys – to woo women – and, in that endeavor, laziness will not do. It also won’t do in your essays. ~N.H. Kleinbaum”

How to Avoid Using the Word Very

One way to avoid using the word “very” is to use more descriptive words or phrases. For example, instead of saying “very tired,” you could say “exhausted.” Instead of saying “very happy,” you could say “overjoyed.” Additionally, you can use adverbs that are stronger than “very,” such as “completely,” “totally,” or “utterly.” Another way to avoid using “very” is to use a phrase that expresses the same thing in a different way, such as “to a great degree” instead of “very much” or “extremely” instead of “very”.

  • Very cold -> Frigid
  • Very tired -> Exhausted
  • Very angry -> Furious
  • Very happy -> Ecstatic
  • Very cheap -> Inexpensive
  • Very fast -> Swift
  • Very big -> Enormous
  • Very small -> Tiny
  • Very hot -> Scorching
  • Very cold -> Bitingly cold
  • Very hungry -> Starving
  • Very thirsty -> Parched
  • Very dirty -> Filthy
  • Very beautiful -> Gorgeous
  • Very slow -> Tedious
  • Very old -> Ancient
  • Very high -> Lofty
  • Very loud -> Deafening
  • Very bright -> Radiant
  • Very dark -> Pitch black
  • Very long -> Interminable
  • Very short -> Petite
  • Very thin -> Skinny
  • Very thick -> Chunky
  • Very heavy -> Massive
  • Very light -> Feathery
  • Very fast -> Lightning fast
  • Very slow -> Sluggish
  • Very easy -> Effortless
  • Very hard -> Herculean
  • Very strong -> Robust
  • Very weak -> Feeble
  • Very sweet -> Saccharine
  • Very sour -> Tart
  • Very salty -> Briny
  • Very bitter -> Harsh
  • Very fresh -> Crisp
  • Very stale -> Musty
  • Very young -> Juvenile
  • Very mature -> Sophisticated
  • Very rich -> Opulent
  • Very poor -> Destitute
  • Very successful -> Triumphant
  • Very failed -> Disastrous
  • Very healthy -> Robust
  • Very sick -> Infirm
  • Very happy -> Elated
  • Very sad -> Despondent
  • Very pleased -> Delighted
  • Very annoyed -> Irritated
  • Extremely thin -> Gaunt
  • Very quiet -> Hushed
  • Very rude -> Impolite
  • Very kind -> Benevolent
  • Very nervous -> Anxious
  • Very calm -> Serene
  • Very hot -> Blazing
  • Very cold -> Arctic
  • Very rich -> Affluent
  • Very poor -> Impoverished
  • Very popular -> Trendy
  • Very disliked -> Unpopular
  • Very intelligent -> Brilliant
  • Very silly -> Goofy
  • Very serious -> Solemn
  • Very playful -> Joyful
  • Very boring -> Dull
  • Very interesting -> Engaging
  • Very simple -> Uncomplicated
  • Very complicated -> Intricate
  • Very wrong -> Incorrect
  • Very right -> Correct
  • Very fast -> Speedy
  • Very slow -> Leisurely
  • Very full -> Stuffed
  • Very empty -> Vacant
  • Very high -> Elevated
  • Very low -> Depressed
  • Very big -> Colossal
  • Very small -> Minute
  • Very hot -> Sweltering
  • Very cold -> Frigid
  • Very wide -> Spacious
  • Very narrow -> Confined

Words to Use Instead of Very in Sentences

Here are some sentences using the words to instead of “very”:

  • He was extremely cold. -> He was frigid.
  • She was very tired. -> She was exhausted.
  • The situation was very angry. -> The situation was furious.
  • The party was very happy. -> The party was ecstatic.
  • The item was very cheap. -> The item was inexpensive.
  • The car was very fast. -> The car was swift.
  • The building was very big. -> The building was enormous.
  • The toy was very small. -> The toy was tiny.
  • The day was very hot. -> The day was scorching.
  • The night was very cold. -> The night was bitingly cold.
  • He was very hungry. -> He was starving.
  • She was very thirsty. -> She was parched.
  • The room was very dirty. -> The room was filthy.
  • The view was very beautiful. -> The view was gorgeous.
  • The progress was very slow. -> The progress was tedious.

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Pem doker
Pem doker
5 years ago

It is so giid to me

Mia
Mia
1 year ago

“good

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