Commonly Confused Words: 7 English Word Pairs that Confuse Absolutely Everyone

It’s hard to deny the fact that the English language has a lot of commonly confused words. They either look alike, sound alike or, worst of all, look and sound alike (but have completely different meanings). Here is a collection of some of the commonly misused words that you often encounter.

Commonly Confused Words in English

There are many commonly confused words in the English language. Below is a list of commonly confused words for ESL Learners.

TO vs TOO

What is the difference between To vs Too?

To

  • Is a preposition

Examples: She stood up and walked to the window.

  • Shows the infinitive form of a verb

Examples: Are you ready to start?

Too

  • Means “as well” or “also”

Examples: “I’m feeling hungry.” – “Me too.”

  • Conveys the idea of “in excess”

Examples: I ate too quickly and got hiccoughs.

TO and TOO

WHO vs WHOM

The difference between who vs whom in English.

Who

  • Is a subject pronoun
  • Used to ask which person does an action or which person is a certain way

Examples: Who are you?

Whom

  • Is an object pronoun
  • Used to ask which person receives an action

Examples: I met a man with whom I used to work.

WHO and WHOM

JUST vs ALREADY

How to use Just vs Already correctly?

Already

Means “even”, “something has happened earlier

Examples: He hasn’t already read this book.

Just

Means “just before”, “a short time ago

Examples: Mr. Thomas has just bought a new shirt.

JUST vs ALREADY

LESS vs FEWER

What’s the difference between Less vs Fewer?

Less

  • Used when talking about things that are uncountable or have no plural
  • Is compatible with collective nouns, non-countable nouns, and volumes

Examples: We must try to spend less money.

Fewer

  • Used when talking about things or people in the plural
  • Used countable nouns and individual items

Examples: She needs fewer clothes this month.

LESS vs. FEWER

MUCH vs MANY

How to Use Much vs Many Correctly?

Much

  • Means a large amount of, or a lot in quantity
  • Used with uncountable nouns. It is mainly used in negative and interrogative clauses.

Examples: I don’t have much money.

Many

  • Means a large number of, or a lot in number
  • Used with countable nouns. It is mainly used in questions, affirmative sentences, and negations

Examples: How many people were there at the concert?

MUCH vs. MANY

SOME vs ANY

Differences between Some vs Any in English.

Some

Used to mean “a little” and “a few

Examples: He has bought some tropical fruits.

Any

Used to mean “no” or “zero

Examples: Do you have any tickets for the concert?

SOME vs ANY

DESPITE vs ALTHOUGH

Learn the differences between Despite vs Although.

Despite

  • Is a preposition
  • After despite we use a noun or a pronoun

Examples: Despite all the difficulties, he still remains optimistic.

Although

  • Is a subordinating conjunction
  • After although we use a clause

Examples: Although she often disagreed with me, she was always courteous.

DESPITE vs. ALTHOUGH

List of Commonly Confused Words | Picture

Commonly Confused Words in English

Commonly Confused Words

Commonly Confused Words: 7 English Word Pairs that Confuse Absolutely Everyone 1

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Vilma

Please check the ”already” vs.” just” table (examples).