Skip to Content

Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs: Elevating Your Learning Game

Sharing is caring!

If you work in education, chances are you have heard of the Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs! Bloom’s Taxonomy is a framework for categorizing educational goals, and the accompanying verbs can be used to describe different levels of thinking and understanding. These verbs can help you tremendously when coming up with a lesson plan or a curriculum.

In this article, we will explore the different levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy and provide examples of verbs that correspond to each level. Whether you’re a student looking to improve your writing skills or a professional seeking to enhance your communication, understanding Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs can be a valuable tool. So let’s dive in and discover how these verbs can take your writing to the next level!

Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs 

Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs: Elevating Your Learning Game

Understanding Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs

As a language learner, you may have heard about Bloom’s Taxonomy, a framework used to classify educational learning objectives into levels of complexity and specificity. Bloom’s Taxonomy is a valuable tool for educators and learners alike, as it helps to clarify instructional goals and guide the learning process.

One of the key components of Bloom’s Taxonomy is the use of action verbs to describe the intended level of learning. These verbs are categorized into six levels, each representing a different type of cognitive skill. The levels are:

  1. Remembering
  2. Understanding
  3. Applying
  4. Analyzing
  5. Evaluating
  6. Creating

Each level is associated with a set of verbs that describe the intended learning outcome. For example, at the Remembering level, learners are expected to recall information, and verbs such as “define,” “list,” and “name” are used to describe this type of learning. At the Evaluating level, learners are expected to make judgments based on criteria, and verbs such as “assess,” “compare,” and “justify” are used to describe this type of learning.

It’s important to note that Bloom’s Taxonomy is hierarchical, meaning that learners must master one level before moving on to the next. This is why the taxonomy is often represented as a pyramid, with the Remembering level at the base and the Creating level at the top.

The Six Levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy

Bloom’s Taxonomy is a framework for categorizing educational goals and objectives into six levels of cognitive complexity. Each level represents a different type of thinking skill that students can develop as they learn. In this section, we will explore each of the six levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy in more detail.

Remembering

The first level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is Remembering. At this level, students are expected to recall information from memory. This includes facts, dates, names, and other details. Some examples of verbs that are commonly used at this level include:

  • Define
  • List
  • Recall
  • Repeat
  • Memorize

Understanding

The second level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is Understanding. At this level, students are expected to demonstrate comprehension of the material. This includes explaining concepts, interpreting information, and summarizing ideas. Some examples of verbs that are commonly used at this level include:

  • Explain
  • Describe
  • Interpret
  • Summarize
  • Paraphrase

Applying

The third level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is Applying. At this level, students are expected to use the information they have learned to solve problems or complete tasks. This includes applying knowledge to new situations, using concepts to solve problems, and demonstrating skills. Some examples of verbs that are commonly used at this level include:

  • Apply
  • Demonstrate
  • Solve
  • Use
  • Illustrate

Analyzing

The fourth level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is Analyzing. At this level, students are expected to break down information into its component parts and examine the relationships between them. This includes identifying patterns, making connections, and drawing conclusions. Some examples of verbs that are commonly used at this level include:

  • Analyze
  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Infer
  • Categorize

Evaluating

The fifth level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is Evaluating. At this level, students are expected to make judgments about the quality or value of information. This includes evaluating arguments, assessing evidence, and making decisions. Some examples of verbs that are commonly used at this level include:

  • Evaluate
  • Judge
  • Critique
  • Assess
  • Justify

Creating

The sixth and final level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is Creating. At this level, students are expected to use their knowledge and skills to generate new ideas or products. This includes designing, inventing, and creating. Some examples of verbs that are commonly used at this level include:

  • Create
  • Design
  • Invent
  • Compose
  • Produce

How to Use Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs

If you’re an English grammar learner, you might have come across Bloom’s Taxonomy while studying. Bloom’s Taxonomy is a framework that categorizes educational goals into six levels of learning. Each level of learning is associated with a set of verbs that describe the cognitive processes involved in achieving that level. The verbs are an essential part of Bloom’s Taxonomy, and they can help you write effective learning objectives. In this section, we’ll discuss how to use Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs.

Step 1: Identify the Level of Learning

The first step in using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs is to identify the level of learning you want to achieve. Bloom’s Taxonomy has six levels of learning, starting from the lowest level of learning to the highest level of learning. The six levels of learning are:

  • Remembering
  • Understanding
  • Applying
  • Analyzing
  • Evaluating
  • Creating

Each level of learning requires a different set of cognitive processes, and the associated verbs reflect those processes.

Step 2: Choose the Appropriate Verb

Once you have identified the level of learning, you need to choose the appropriate verb that reflects the cognitive process associated with that level. Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs are action words that describe what the learner is expected to do. For example, if you want your learners to remember something, you might use verbs like “define,” “list,” or “memorize.” If you want your learners to evaluate something, you might use verbs like “judge,” “compare,” or “assess.”

Step 3: Write the Learning Objective

After you have identified the appropriate verb, you need to write the learning objective. A learning objective is a statement that describes what the learner will be able to do after completing the learning activity. A well-written learning objective should be specific, measurable, and achievable. It should also be written in a way that is easy to understand and aligns with the level of learning and the associated verb.

For example, if you want your learners to remember the parts of speech, you might write a learning objective like this:

“By the end of this lesson, the learner will be able to define the eight parts of speech.”

Step 4: Assess the Learning

The final step in using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs is to assess the learning. Assessment is an essential part of the learning process, and it helps you determine whether your learners have achieved the learning objective. You can use various assessment methods, such as quizzes, tests, assignments, or projects, to assess the learning.

In conclusion, using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs can help you write effective learning objectives that align with the level of learning you want to achieve. By following these steps, you can create learning objectives that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Examples of Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs in Action

Bloom’s Taxonomy is a framework for categorizing educational goals into six levels of cognitive complexity. Each level is associated with a set of action verbs that describe the type of thinking required to achieve the goal. In this section, we’ll explore some examples of Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs in action.

Remembering

At the lowest level of Bloom’s Taxonomy, remembering, students are asked to recall information from memory. Examples of verbs associated with this level include:

  • Define
  • List
  • Name
  • Recall
  • Recognize
  • State

For example:

  • Define the term “adjective.”
  • List the planets in our solar system.
  • Name the capital of France.
  • Recall the plot of “Romeo and Juliet.”
  • Recognize the author of “To Kill a Mockingbird.”
  • State the formula for calculating the area of a circle.

Understanding

At the next level, understanding, students are asked to demonstrate comprehension of the material. Examples of verbs associated with this level include:

  • Explain
  • Interpret
  • Paraphrase
  • Summarize

For example:

  • Explain the difference between a metaphor and a simile.
  • Interpret the meaning of a poem.
  • Paraphrase a passage from a novel.
  • Summarize the main points of an article.

Applying

At the applying level, students are asked to use their knowledge to solve problems or complete tasks. Examples of verbs associated with this level include:

  • Apply
  • Demonstrate
  • Implement
  • Solve

For example:

  • Apply the Pythagorean theorem to find the length of a missing side of a right triangle.
  • Demonstrate how to properly use a semicolon in a sentence.
  • Implement a plan to reduce waste in a school cafeteria.
  • Solve a logic puzzle.

Analyzing

At the analyzing level, students are asked to break down complex information into its component parts. Examples of verbs associated with this level include:

  • Analyze
  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Differentiate

For example:

  • Analyze the themes in a novel.
  • Compare and contrast two different theories.
  • Differentiate between a fact and an opinion.
  • Analyze the causes of a historical event.

Evaluating

At the evaluating level, students are asked to make judgments about the quality or value of something. Examples of verbs associated with this level include:

  • Evaluate
  • Critique
  • Judge
  • Justify

For example:

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of a marketing campaign.
  • Critique a work of art.
  • Judge the fairness of a policy.
  • Justify a decision.

Creating

At the highest level of Bloom’s Taxonomy, creating, students are asked to generate new ideas or products. Examples of verbs associated with this level include:

  • Create
  • Design
  • Develop
  • Invent

For example:

  • Create a short story.
  • Design a new product.
  • Develop a marketing plan.
  • Invent a new game.

In conclusion, Bloom’s Taxonomy provides a useful framework for educators and students to understand the complexity of learning objectives. By using action verbs associated with each level, teachers can create more effective assessments and lesson plans that challenge students to think at higher levels of cognitive complexity.

Common Mistakes When Using Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs

Bloom’s Taxonomy is a widely used framework for developing educational objectives. It provides a structured approach to creating learning outcomes that are measurable and aligned with the intended level of learning. However, using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs can be tricky, and there are some common mistakes that people make when applying the framework. In this section, we will discuss some of these mistakes and how to avoid them.

Mistake 1: Using the Wrong Verb

One of the most common mistakes when using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs is using the wrong verb to describe the intended level of learning. For example, using the verb “understand” for a learning outcome that requires higher-order thinking skills such as analysis or evaluation. To avoid this mistake, it is essential to choose the appropriate verb that accurately describes the intended level of learning.

Mistake 2: Using Verbs that are Not Measurable

Another common mistake is using verbs that are not measurable. For example, using the verb “appreciate” for a learning outcome that cannot be objectively measured. To avoid this mistake, it is essential to choose verbs that are specific and measurable, such as “identify,” “analyze,” or “evaluate.”

Mistake 3: Using Too Many Verbs

Using too many verbs can make it difficult to create clear and concise learning outcomes. It is important to choose the most appropriate verb that accurately describes the intended level of learning. Using too many verbs can also make it challenging to assess the learning outcomes. To avoid this mistake, it is essential to choose the most appropriate verb that accurately describes the intended level of learning.

Mistake 4: Using Verbs that are Too Complex

Using verbs that are too complex can make it difficult for learners to understand the intended learning outcomes. It is important to choose verbs that are appropriate for the level of learning and the learners’ abilities. To avoid this mistake, it is essential to choose verbs that are clear and concise.

Tips for Implementing Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs in Lessons

When it comes to designing effective lessons, using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs is an excellent way to ensure that your students are engaging with the content at a deeper level. Here are some tips to help you implement Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs in your lessons:

1. Use Action Verbs

One of the most important things to keep in mind when using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs is to use action verbs that align with each level of the taxonomy. For example, if you’re designing an objective for the “Comprehension” level, you might use verbs like “explain,” “summarize,” or “paraphrase.” Using these verbs will help ensure that your students understand what is expected of them and can engage with the material at a deeper level.

2. Align Objectives with Assessments

Another key aspect of using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs is to ensure that your objectives align with your assessments. For example, if your objective is to have students “analyze” a particular text, your assessment should also require them to analyze that text in some way. This alignment will help ensure that your students are engaging with the material in a meaningful way and will help you accurately assess their understanding.

3. Incorporate Higher-Level Verbs

While it’s important to use verbs that align with each level of the taxonomy, it’s also important to incorporate higher-level verbs into your lessons. These verbs, such as “create,” “evaluate,” and “synthesize,” require students to engage with the material at a deeper level and can help them develop critical thinking skills. By incorporating these higher-level verbs into your lessons, you can help your students develop a deeper understanding of the material and prepare them for more complex tasks.

4. Provide Clear Instructions

Finally, when using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs in your lessons, it’s important to provide clear instructions to your students. Make sure that your objectives are clear and concise, and that your students understand what is expected of them. Additionally, provide clear instructions for any assessments or activities that you assign, so that your students know exactly what they need to do to be successful.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Bloom’s Taxonomy is an essential tool for educators, especially when it comes to creating effective learning outcomes. By using the appropriate verbs for each level of the taxonomy, teachers can ensure that their students are developing the necessary skills and knowledge to succeed in their studies.

Remembering, Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating, and Creating are the six levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy, each with its own set of verbs. Teachers can use these verbs to create learning objectives that align with the desired level of cognitive complexity.

Using Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs in the classroom can help students develop critical thinking skills, improve their problem-solving abilities, and enhance their overall learning experience. Additionally, using these verbs can help teachers assess student learning more effectively.

Here are some examples of Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs and the levels they correspond to:

Level Verb
Remembering Define, List, Recall
Understanding Explain, Summarize, Paraphrase
Applying Demonstrate, Use, Apply
Analyzing Compare, Contrast, Analyze
Evaluating Evaluate, Judge, Critique
Creating Design, Plan, Create

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some examples of learning objectives using Bloom’s taxonomy verbs?

Some examples of learning objectives using Bloom’s taxonomy verbs include “analyze the theme of the novel,” “evaluate the effectiveness of a persuasive argument,” and “create a multimedia presentation to demonstrate understanding of a topic.” These verbs are action-oriented and help to specify the level of thinking required to achieve the learning objective.

How can Bloom’s taxonomy be applied to English language teaching?

Bloom’s taxonomy can be applied to English language teaching by helping teachers to develop effective lesson plans that promote critical thinking and deeper understanding of the language. By using Bloom’s taxonomy verbs, teachers can create learning objectives that require students to analyze, evaluate, and create using the language, rather than simply memorizing vocabulary and grammar rules.

What are the benefits of using Bloom’s taxonomy in English lesson planning?

The benefits of using Bloom’s taxonomy in English lesson planning include promoting higher-order thinking skills, enhancing student engagement and motivation, and providing clear learning objectives for both teachers and students. By using Bloom’s taxonomy, teachers can also ensure that their lessons are aligned with the learning goals and objectives of their students.

How can Bloom’s taxonomy help improve student comprehension and critical thinking?

Bloom’s taxonomy can help improve student comprehension and critical thinking by providing a framework for teachers to create learning objectives that require higher-order thinking skills. By using Bloom’s taxonomy verbs, teachers can challenge students to analyze, evaluate, and create using the language, rather than simply memorizing vocabulary and grammar rules.

What are some effective ways to incorporate Bloom’s taxonomy into English grammar instruction?

Some effective ways to incorporate Bloom’s taxonomy into English grammar instruction include creating learning objectives that require students to analyze and evaluate the use of grammar in authentic texts, providing opportunities for students to create their own sentences and paragraphs using the grammar rules, and using real-life situations to demonstrate the practical application of grammar rules. By incorporating Bloom’s taxonomy into English grammar instruction, teachers can help students to develop a deeper understanding of the language and promote critical thinking skills.

Some examples of learning objectives using Bloom's taxonomy verbs include \"analyze the theme of the novel,\" \"evaluate the effectiveness of a persuasive argument,\" and \"create a multimedia presentation to demonstrate understanding of a topic.\" These verbs are action-oriented and help to specify the level of thinking required to achieve the learning objective.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"How can Bloom's taxonomy be applied to English language teaching?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Bloom's taxonomy can be applied to English language teaching by helping teachers to develop effective lesson plans that promote critical thinking and deeper understanding of the language. By using Bloom's taxonomy verbs, teachers can create learning objectives that require students to analyze, evaluate, and create using the language, rather than simply memorizing vocabulary and grammar rules.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What are the benefits of using Bloom's taxonomy in English lesson planning?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

The benefits of using Bloom's taxonomy in English lesson planning include promoting higher-order thinking skills, enhancing student engagement and motivation, and providing clear learning objectives for both teachers and students. By using Bloom's taxonomy, teachers can also ensure that their lessons are aligned with the learning goals and objectives of their students.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What are some commonly used verbs in Bloom's taxonomy?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Some commonly used verbs in Bloom's taxonomy include \"analyze,\" \"evaluate,\" \"create,\" \"apply,\" \"understand,\" \"remember,\" and \"describe.\" These verbs help to specify the level of thinking required to achieve a learning objective and promote deeper understanding and critical thinking.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"How can Bloom's taxonomy help improve student comprehension and critical thinking?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Bloom's taxonomy can help improve student comprehension and critical thinking by providing a framework for teachers to create learning objectives that require higher-order thinking skills. By using Bloom's taxonomy verbs, teachers can challenge students to analyze, evaluate, and create using the language, rather than simply memorizing vocabulary and grammar rules.

"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What are some effective ways to incorporate Bloom's taxonomy into English grammar instruction?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Some effective ways to incorporate Bloom's taxonomy into English grammar instruction include creating learning objectives that require students to analyze and evaluate the use of grammar in authentic texts, providing opportunities for students to create their own sentences and paragraphs using the grammar rules, and using real-life situations to demonstrate the practical application of grammar rules. By incorporating Bloom's taxonomy into English grammar instruction, teachers can help students to develop a deeper understanding of the language and promote critical thinking skills.

"}}]}

ESLBUZZ