10+ Common Conversational Structures in English

Conversational structures – speaking conversational English is usually just about knowing the right thing to say in any given situation.

Common Conversational Structures in English

  • Do you want me to + (verb)

Meaning:

To ‘want’ is to feel or have a desire for. When saying ‘Do you want me to’ you’re asking someone if there is anything you can do for them or assist them with.

Examples:

Do you want me to pick up the kids?

Do you want me to fix your flat tire?

Meaning:

Using ‘could have’ you are speaking about something that was, should be or would be. You are stating that they had other options that could have been chosen.

Examples:

You could have completed it sooner.

You could have done better on your exam.

You could have blown your chance.

You could have given more time to get ready.

  • If I were you, I would + (verb)

Meaning:

Here you are giving an example of what decision YOU would do given the circumstances. This can be in past tense or in a conditional present.

Examples:

If I were you, I would enjoy my vacation.

If I were you, I would answer the question.

If I were you, I would have enjoyed my vacation.

If I were you, I would have explained what happened. (PAST TENSE)

  • Are you into + (noun)

Meaning:

Here you are asking a question about what an interest they might have or something they might enjoy doing.

Examples:

Are you into soccer?

Are you into scary movies?

Are you into trying new things?

Are you into playing games?

Are you into wine tasting?

Are you into jogging?

  • That’s why + (subject + verb)

Meaning:

‘That’s’ is short for ‘that is’. Here you are telling someone ‘because of this’ or ‘therefore’.

Examples:

That’s why people admire you.

That’s why she appears so happy.

That’s why you fail to understand.

  • It’s gonna be + (adjective)

Meaning:

You’re informing someone what something is going to be like. This could be something you are going to do, see or feel.

Examples:

It’s gonna be easy.

It’s gonna be depressing.

  • It looks like + (noun)

Meaning:

You could be describing how something is similar or appears to be by the way it looks.

Examples:

It looks like a jellyfish.

It looks like a banana.

It looks like it’s going to rain.

It looks like they are leaving.

  • It takes + (time) + to + (verb)

Meaning:

You are letting someone know how long it will take to do a particular thing.

Examples:

It takes one hour to get there.

It takes forty-five minutes for me to get ready.

It takes me one hour to cook.

  • Here’s to + (noun)

Meaning:

‘Here’s to’ is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Examples:

Here’s to the winner!

Here’s to your marriage!

Here’s to the New Year!

Here’s to great friends!

  • It’s no use + (verb-ing)

Meaning:

It’s a contraction for ‘it is’. By stating ‘it’s no use’ you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Examples:

It’s no use crying.

It’s no use separating them.

It’s no use talking to her.

It’s no use cleaning up.

  • Rumor has it that + (subject + verb)

Meaning:

‘Rumor has it’ is an expression used when suggesting you might have heard something or read about something that is taking place now or in the future. A rumor is not fact.

Examples:

Rumor has it that she cheated on him.

Rumor has it that you like to paint.

Rumor has it that he will not return.

Common Conversational Structures in English | Image

Common Conversational Structures

10+ Common Conversational Structures in English 1

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